September202014

thescarletwindow:

The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.

I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.

We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.

I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!

I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.

The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

(via thisclockworkheart)

2PM
mythosrpa:

                         A GUIDE ON BANSHEES
Banshees (/ˈbænʃiː/ BAN-shee) are female spirits, or fairies, in Irish mythology. Banshees are commonly referred to as an omen of death and a messenger from the underworld, and are known to wail if someone is about to die. The cry of a Banshee has been described as “a thin, screeching noise somewhere between the wail of a woman and the moan of an owl.” In scottish Gaelic mythology, she is known as the bean sith or bean nighe and is known for washing the bloodstained clothes of those who are about to die.
Read More

mythosrpa:

                         A GUIDE ON BANSHEES

Banshees (/ˈbænʃ/ BAN-shee) are female spirits, or fairies, in Irish mythology. Banshees are commonly referred to as an omen of death and a messenger from the underworld, and are known to wail if someone is about to die. The cry of a Banshee has been described as “a thin, screeching noise somewhere between the wail of a woman and the moan of an owl.” In scottish Gaelic mythology, she is known as the bean sith or bean nighe and is known for washing the bloodstained clothes of those who are about to die.

Read More

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

10AM

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

elleirise:

sassy-gay-justice:

bluedogeyes:

Princeless – Book One: Save Yourself (2012)

Story: Jeremy Whitley , art: M. Goodwin

Avaliable at comixology / amazon

"And this one—-"

NO

Protective clothing that actually protects is such a novel idea.

I featured the first three panels waaay back, but the broader context makes it even better!

~Ozzie

(via howtofightwrite)

7AM
fjarilsdrottning:

Rosey*:・゚✧

fjarilsdrottning:

Rosey*:・゚✧

(via fuckyeahhomestuck)

4AM
September192014

essayofthoughts:

indigoumbrella:

essayofthoughts:

indigoumbrella:

huffpostarts:

In The Not So Distant Future, Glow-In-The-Dark Trees Could Replace Street Lights

Is that… is that even healthy?

There are sea organisms and fungi which glow in the dark and there’s fireflies and jellyfish which glow in the dark. It doesn’t do them any harm nor does it do the people around them any harm. I would say its pretty healthy, as well as it would mean more photosynthesis happening in cities which mean cleaner air.

I was just curious about how they were doing it and for some reason I didn’t think to click the link. But thanks! It makes more sense now. I was afraid it was some kind of chemical thing.

nah just genetic modification using existing bioluminescent genes. Genetics is really cool, and so is bioluminescence. I mean they’ve already made pigs glow using jellyfish genes and pigs are waaay more complicated than trees iirc. So they’re actually (i think) less likely to muck it up with trees.

In which case

GLOWY

FORESTS

GLOWY

TREES

GLOWY

EVERYTHING

(I like glowy things)

(via clevergirlhelps)

5PM
ilovecharts:

Types of Japanese Swords

ilovecharts:

Types of Japanese Swords

(Source: 138braincells, via clevergirlhelps)

2PM

yungursaminor:

tchy:

polnitsch:

mj-the-scientist:

megacosms:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.

Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

I experience forms of this. 

I have grapheme-color synesthesia. I made a post about it, like, a year ago. Where did I put that thing? Anyway, I’m an associator. :D

I remember reading about this in horrible science when I was young. There was a guy could apparently remember everything in his life due to synesthesia. I also remember he once told someone: “What a crumbly yellow voice you have!”

No formal diagnosis but ordinal-linguistic personification represent! It’s letters, numerals, and months for me. Letters are the strongest one.

reblogging with all the crap because it has the source but oh hey, i’m actually confirmed by a doctor to have this. it’s the most frustratingly beautiful thing.

(via clevergirlhelps)

10AM
“[Tom Wolfe] pronunciations are steadfastly spelled out—‘sump’m’ for ‘something,’ ‘far fat’ for ‘fire fight’—in a way that a Faulkner character would be spared. For Faulkner, Southern life was life; for Wolfe it is a provincial curiosity…”

—John Updike explaining why writing a character’s accent is the most annoying thing ever. Thank you sir.

It never comes off as authentic and ALWAYS comes off as trying too hard or making fun of the region your character is from. 

(via nosferatoos)

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

7AM
medievalpoc:

mediumaevum:

Medieval Hair Care
So that hair might grow wherever you wish. Take barley bread with the crust, and grind it with salt and bear fat. But first burn the barley bread. With this mixture anoint the place and the hair will grow.
Cook down dregs of white wine with honey to the consistency of a cerotum and anoint the hair, if you wish it to be golden. 
If the woman wishes to have long and black hair, take a green lizard and, having removed its head and tail , cook it in common oil. Anoint the head with this oil. It makes the hair long and black.
If, needed, you wish to have hair soft and smooth and fine, wash it often with hot water in which there is powder of natron [Native hydrous sodium carbonate] and vetch.
Take some dried roses, clove, nutmeg, watercress and galangal. Let all these, powdered, be mixed with rose water. With this water let her sprinkle her hair and comb it with a comb dipped in this same water so that [her hair] will smell better. And let her make furrows in her hair and sprinkle on the above-mentioned powder, and it will smell marvelously.
("De Ornatu Mulierum /On Women’s Cosmetics." in The Trotula : A Medieval Compendium of Women’s Medicine (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2001))
image: Lorenzo Costa, Portrait of a Woman

Fun fact-some of these do work. And, they can work for Medieval POC, too! Just keep in mind that “Natural” isn’t always “Better”; the risk of allergic reactions and irritations is going to be there with pretty much any treatment or cosmetic made from plants or animals.
The “dregs of white wine” is probably dilute vinegar, which will lighten your hair, and the honey will moisturize it. This is fairly safe and beneficial for all hair types including Black hair, and can gently add highlights. Don’t, however, use undiluted vinegar on your hair or scalp.

[source]
The powder of natron is a powerful water softener, also called “washing soda” and “soda ash”. This makes water clean the hair more effectively, which in turn will make it softer. If the “vetch” referred to is milk vetch, the root is still used sometimes topically to increase blood flow to the area, which can theoretically increase hair growth. Although using soda ash in higher concentrations can significantly damage your hair, in controlled applications, it also loosens curls. It’s even used marketed as “Natural Hair Relaxer” for Black hair, under brand names like “Natralaxer”. In more dilute mixtures, it’s very good clarifier for any texture of oily hair, especially if your hair is very thick or coarse.

[source]
The dressing for hair growth with bear fat is an almost universally used recipe all over the world. Bear tallow pomade has been used by Indigenous Americans, Ancient China, Medieval Europe…pretty much everywhere. You can actually still buy it for that purpose. I think that the barley bread ash (charcoal, basically) was probably used for color and shine; a lot of different people mixed pigments into bear grease to add color and shine to their hair.This dressing used on long Black hair would have created a style much like this one:

[source]
Rather than bear fat, I find coconut oil to be an improvement. I often use it for braided styles myself, and I think that adding a bit of pigment or color to it would be a fun experiment.

[source]
Speaking of coloring hair…I have no clue whatsoever whether lizard frying oil would make a difference in hair color, but there’s honestly no reason to suppose that some kind of chemical produced by its skin couldn’t have caused a change in color…dyes and pigments can come from unlikely sources. Remember when everyone was freaking out because Starbucks used a coloring made from crushed beetles to color some of its drinks? All sorts of items have been used by all genders throughout history to add that extra special something to their hairstyles.

[source]
The hair perfume would certainly have smelled lovely, but a lot of the ingredients, like the clove, nutmeg, and galangal are not native to Europe and would have been imported from Southeast Asia and quite expensive. The ingredients as well as the recipes would have traveled from those areas. Galangal especially has beneficial topical uses similar to ginger, or tea tree oil. It’s mildly antimicrobial, so if there’s anything like fungus or dandruff clogging up your follicles, it can remove impediments to hair growth. Nutmeg oil can also mildly lighten hair a little. And all of them will result in a tingly, “spicy” scalp, and can cause burning if you have sensitive skin.

[source]
A last note-these cosmetic recipes come from a book known as “The Trotula”, which was created by Trotula of Salerno, who revolutionized Medieval medicine by and for women, synthesizing knowledge flowing out of Asia and the Middle East regarding medicine and specifically gynecology. In Medieval Europe, some of the most well-known people of color were physicians, because African and Asian medicine was well-known and revered.

Wikipedia page for Trotula

medievalpoc:

mediumaevum:

Medieval Hair Care

  • So that hair might grow wherever you wish. Take barley bread with the crust, and grind it with salt and bear fat. But first burn the barley bread. With this mixture anoint the place and the hair will grow.
  • Cook down dregs of white wine with honey to the consistency of a cerotum and anoint the hair, if you wish it to be golden
  • If the woman wishes to have long and black hair, take a green lizard and, having removed its head and tail , cook it in common oil. Anoint the head with this oil. It makes the hair long and black.
  • If, needed, you wish to have hair soft and smooth and fine, wash it often with hot water in which there is powder of natron [Native hydrous sodium carbonate] and vetch.
  • Take some dried roses, clove, nutmeg, watercress and galangal. Let all these, powdered, be mixed with rose water. With this water let her sprinkle her hair and comb it with a comb dipped in this same water so that [her hair] will smell better. And let her make furrows in her hair and sprinkle on the above-mentioned powder, and it will smell marvelously.

("De Ornatu Mulierum /On Women’s Cosmetics." in The Trotula : A Medieval Compendium of Women’s Medicine (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2001))

image: Lorenzo Costa, Portrait of a Woman

Fun fact-some of these do work. And, they can work for Medieval POC, too! Just keep in mind that “Natural” isn’t always “Better”; the risk of allergic reactions and irritations is going to be there with pretty much any treatment or cosmetic made from plants or animals.

The “dregs of white wine” is probably dilute vinegar, which will lighten your hair, and the honey will moisturize it. This is fairly safe and beneficial for all hair types including Black hair, and can gently add highlights. Don’t, however, use undiluted vinegar on your hair or scalp.

image

[source]

The powder of natron is a powerful water softener, also called “washing soda” and “soda ash”. This makes water clean the hair more effectively, which in turn will make it softer. If the “vetch” referred to is milk vetch, the root is still used sometimes topically to increase blood flow to the area, which can theoretically increase hair growth. Although using soda ash in higher concentrations can significantly damage your hair, in controlled applications, it also loosens curls. It’s even used marketed as “Natural Hair Relaxer” for Black hair, under brand names like “Natralaxer”. In more dilute mixtures, it’s very good clarifier for any texture of oily hair, especially if your hair is very thick or coarse.

image

[source]

The dressing for hair growth with bear fat is an almost universally used recipe all over the world. Bear tallow pomade has been used by Indigenous Americans, Ancient China, Medieval Europe…pretty much everywhere. You can actually still buy it for that purpose. I think that the barley bread ash (charcoal, basically) was probably used for color and shine; a lot of different people mixed pigments into bear grease to add color and shine to their hair.This dressing used on long Black hair would have created a style much like this one:

image

[source]

Rather than bear fat, I find coconut oil to be an improvement. I often use it for braided styles myself, and I think that adding a bit of pigment or color to it would be a fun experiment.

image

[source]

Speaking of coloring hair…I have no clue whatsoever whether lizard frying oil would make a difference in hair color, but there’s honestly no reason to suppose that some kind of chemical produced by its skin couldn’t have caused a change in color…dyes and pigments can come from unlikely sources. Remember when everyone was freaking out because Starbucks used a coloring made from crushed beetles to color some of its drinks? All sorts of items have been used by all genders throughout history to add that extra special something to their hairstyles.

image

[source]

The hair perfume would certainly have smelled lovely, but a lot of the ingredients, like the clove, nutmeg, and galangal are not native to Europe and would have been imported from Southeast Asia and quite expensive. The ingredients as well as the recipes would have traveled from those areas. Galangal especially has beneficial topical uses similar to ginger, or tea tree oil. It’s mildly antimicrobial, so if there’s anything like fungus or dandruff clogging up your follicles, it can remove impediments to hair growth. Nutmeg oil can also mildly lighten hair a little. And all of them will result in a tingly, “spicy” scalp, and can cause burning if you have sensitive skin.

image

[source]

A last note-these cosmetic recipes come from a book known as “The Trotula”, which was created by Trotula of Salerno, who revolutionized Medieval medicine by and for women, synthesizing knowledge flowing out of Asia and the Middle East regarding medicine and specifically gynecology. In Medieval Europe, some of the most well-known people of color were physicians, because African and Asian medicine was well-known and revered.

image

Wikipedia page for Trotula

(Source: gallowglass.org, via clevergirlhelps)

4AM

//Dark and Magical Beings//

Furies -

In Greek and Roman mythology, the Furies were female spirits of justice and vengeance. They were also called the Erinyes (angry ones). Known especially for pursuing people who had murdered family members, the Furies punished their victims by driving them mad. When not punishing wrongdoers on earth, they lived in the underworldand tortured the damned.

According to some stories, the Furies were sisters born from the blood of Uranus, the primevalgod of the sky, when he was wounded by his son Cronus*. In other stories, they were the children of Nyx (night). In either case, their primeval origin set them apart from the other deitiesof the Greek and Roman pantheons.

Most tales mention three Furies: Allecto (endless), Tisiphone (punishment), and Megaera (jealous rage). Usually imagined as monstrous, foul-smelling hags, the sisters had bats’ wings, coal-black skin, and hair entwined with serpents. They carried torches, whips, and cups of venom with which to torment wrongdoers. The Furies could also appear as storm clouds or swarms of insects.

(via fairydoll)

September182014

Hayao Miyazaki talking about his passion for animation while seeing the world through his fascinating career. From the documentary: The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness (2013)

(Source: asaaf00, via studioghibligifs)

5PM
2PM

sixpenceee:

THE GHOST CLOCK

Located in the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The description on the plaque says:

"At first glance, Ghost Clock appears to be a grandfather clock hidden by a large white sheet tied with a rope. A close look, however, reveals a masterful deception: this entire sculpture was hand-carved from a single block of laminated mahogany. With meticulous detail, Castle re-created in wood the contours of soft, supple cloth, then completed the illusion by bleaching the “drapery” white and staining the base of the “clock” a walnut brown. This work is the last in a series of thirteen clocks the artist created in the 1980s; unlike the others, it lacks an inner mechanism. Its haunting stillness and silence suggest eternity—the absence of time.”

(via fairydoll)

10AM
beautiful-tragicinthefalloutboy:

"Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons."

beautiful-tragicinthefalloutboy:

"Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons."

(via howtofightwrite)

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